MMISA

A foreigner who wishes to study in the Republic of South Africa for longer than three months requires:

1. An official letter of provisional enrolment by the learning institute stating the following:

  • Details regarding arranged accommodation, if any.
  • That the applicant has sufficient funds to cover tuition fees, maintenance and incidental cost.
  • In the case of a minor, the particulars of the person in the Republic who will act as the learner’s guardian and proof of consent for the intended stay from both parents or from sole custody parent along with proof of sole custody.
  • The course or academic programme for which the applicant has been accepted and that the applicant has the required qualifications to attend it, including any applicable language proficiency requirement.
  • The undertaking by the learning institute to notify the department when the learner has completed his/her studies.


2. Proof of funds.

3. Details regarding accommodation.

4. In the case of a minor, a letter of consent from parents or guardians.

5. A letter from person in RSA who will act as guardian.

6. Proof of qualifications.

7. Police clearance certificate.

8. Medical Insurance.

 
Visa Payment
Applications for study visas to South Africa generally require the payment of fees which could amount to anything between R1000 to R2500. This differs from country to country but is usually cheaper and easier to obtain in the country of origin than in South Africa. Prospective applicants are therefore advised to apply in their own country and not to travel to South Africa in the hope that internal applications could be more expeditious.

Applicants that arrive at our doorstep without the proper papers designating our institute as their place of study may not be accepted as students as per government regulations. Acceptances of such students carry a heavy penalty which the institute cannot afford and which may jeopardize our continued running. No exceptions are therefore made in this regard and any applications for concessions are disregarded.

Visa applications can also have hidden costs - such as the requirement of medical insurance prior to the granting of visas - and applicants are to ensure proper communication with their respective embassies so as to not fall prey to unforeseen complications. The institute is however prepared to provide temporary medical insurance for foreign applicant to facilitate visa acceptance. Upon arrival on the shores of South Africa such students are however required to personally secure medical insurance at any of the local insurance companies acceptable to the respective authorities.